Takayama Inari Jinja

Source:pixta

Takayama Inari Jinja is known as Aomori's best spiritual shrine where gods of abundant harvest, safety for sea travel, and business success will bless your prayers. People come to this shrine to pray for various reasons: agriculture, business, industry, fishing industry, well-being of family, sickness and recovery, safe travels, getting rid of evil spirits, etc. Furthermore, you will see a precious road led by thousand Torii gates, like Fushimi Inari Taisha in Kyoto. Since it is situated in a quiet forest, it is a perfect place to calm your mind.

Address
147-1 Ushigata-cho, Tsugaru-shi, Aomori
Contact No.
+81-173-56-2015
Access
30 min by car from Goshogawara Station on JR Gono Line (Tsugarugoshogawara Station on Tsugaru Line) Take a Konan bus bound for Goshogawara/Kodomari (via Jusan). 30 min walk from "Takayama Jinja Iriguchi" stop.
Opening Hours / Holidays
8:00-17:00
Open all year round
Official Website
http://www.aptinet.jp/Detail_display_00000530.html
Time Required
1 hour
Admission fee
Free

※ Some information is displayed in Japanese and machine-translated English, which may not be accurate.
For the latest information, please check the official website for each spot.

Thousand Tori (gates) look like a cute miniature

Like Fushimi Inari Taisha in Kyoto, this shrine also has a road led by thousand tori. Those tori are colorful and beautiful. Some people come here to take pictures because "the tori look like a cute miniature." On top of that, you can capture an image of many tori with a beautiful Japanese garden. The place looks fantastic during the cherry blossom season as well.

Source:pixta

Statues of foxes

There is an area in this shrine, where many statues of kitsune (Japanese fox, considered a messenger of god) are placed here. These statues used be enshrined at a small private shrine in Takayama Inari Jinja or at other shrines all over the country back in the olden days. In fact, they are were placed here after fulfilling their function. It is strange so see so many statues of fox in one place.

Small shrines lined up mysteriously

There are also several small shrines lined up inside the territory of the shrine. Like the kitsune, these small shrines once belonged to individuals who had them in their private homes, or shrines. It is strange and rare to see so many lined up like this.

Takayama Inari Jinja

Takayama Inari Jinja is known as Aomori's best spiritual shrine where gods of abundant harvest, safety for sea travel, and business success will bless your prayers. People come to this shrine to pray for various reasons: agriculture, business, industry, fishing industry, well-being of family, sickness and recovery, safe travels, getting rid of evil spirits, etc. Furthermore, you will see a precious road led by thousand Torii gates, like Fushimi Inari Taisha in Kyoto. Since it is situated in a quiet forest, it is a perfect place to calm your mind.

※ Some information is displayed in Japanese and machine-translated English, which may not be accurate.
For the latest information, please check the official website for each spot.

Thousand Tori (gates) look like a cute miniature

Like Fushimi Inari Taisha in Kyoto, this shrine also has a road led by thousand tori. Those tori are colorful and beautiful. Some people come here to take pictures because "the tori look like a cute miniature." On top of that, you can capture an image of many tori with a beautiful Japanese garden. The place looks fantastic during the cherry blossom season as well.

Source:pixta

Statues of foxes

There is an area in this shrine, where many statues of kitsune (Japanese fox, considered a messenger of god) are placed here. These statues used be enshrined at a small private shrine in Takayama Inari Jinja or at other shrines all over the country back in the olden days. In fact, they are were placed here after fulfilling their function. It is strange so see so many statues of fox in one place.

Small shrines lined up mysteriously

There are also several small shrines lined up inside the territory of the shrine. Like the kitsune, these small shrines once belonged to individuals who had them in their private homes, or shrines. It is strange and rare to see so many lined up like this.

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