Ryozen-ji

Source:pixta

Ryozen-ji is the first temple in the Shikoku Henro or the Shikoku Pilgrimage. The temple is popularly known as "Ichiban san," and it offers clothing and necessities for the pilgrimage. There is a tower called Taho-to and Hosho-ike (pond) that has carps in the precinct creating a refined atmosphere. The temple is crowded all year round with pilgrims in white clothing from all over the world. Nowadays, many people visit the temple as a power spot or for their health.

Address
126 Aza-Tsukahana, Oasa-ho Bando, Naruto-shi, Tokushima
Contact No.
+81-88-689-1111
Access
5-min walk from Bando Station on JR Line
Opening Hours / Holidays
7:00-17:00
Open all year round
Official Website
http://www.88shikokuhenro.jp/tokushima/01ryozenji/
Time Required
60 minutes
Admission fee
Free

※ Some information is displayed in Japanese and machine-translated English, which may not be accurate.
For the latest information, please check the official website for each spot.

What is O-henro?

In the Heian period about 1,300 years ago, a famous Buddhist monk, Kobo Daishi, founded 88 temples in Shikoku to ward off harmful things. The journey of O-henro begins at the first temple Ryozen-ji, then continues to Kochi and Ehime prefecture. The long 1,400 km journey ends at the 88th Okubo-ji in Kagawa prefecture. If you make this pilgrimage on foot all the way, it would take 40 to 60 days.

Source:pixta

Hosho-ike and Haiku

Six golden mizuko (diseased fetus or stillborn babies) are kneeling down on lotus leaves and looking up at Mizuko Jizo (guardian) in Hosho-ike. Near the pond, you can contribute your Haiku (traditional Japanese poem) in a box called Sanpai Haiku Tokubako.

Lanterns and a Ceiling Painting of a Dragon

The main hall has numerous lanterns. Their gentle orange light illuminates the dim hall beautifully and solemnly. There is a dragon painted on the ceiling, and the expressions of the dragon changes depending on the viewing angle.

Source:pixta

Ryozen-ji

Ryozen-ji is the first temple in the Shikoku Henro or the Shikoku Pilgrimage. The temple is popularly known as "Ichiban san," and it offers clothing and necessities for the pilgrimage. There is a tower called Taho-to and Hosho-ike (pond) that has carps in the precinct creating a refined atmosphere. The temple is crowded all year round with pilgrims in white clothing from all over the world. Nowadays, many people visit the temple as a power spot or for their health.

※ Some information is displayed in Japanese and machine-translated English, which may not be accurate.
For the latest information, please check the official website for each spot.

What is O-henro?

In the Heian period about 1,300 years ago, a famous Buddhist monk, Kobo Daishi, founded 88 temples in Shikoku to ward off harmful things. The journey of O-henro begins at the first temple Ryozen-ji, then continues to Kochi and Ehime prefecture. The long 1,400 km journey ends at the 88th Okubo-ji in Kagawa prefecture. If you make this pilgrimage on foot all the way, it would take 40 to 60 days.

Source:pixta

Hosho-ike and Haiku

Six golden mizuko (diseased fetus or stillborn babies) are kneeling down on lotus leaves and looking up at Mizuko Jizo (guardian) in Hosho-ike. Near the pond, you can contribute your Haiku (traditional Japanese poem) in a box called Sanpai Haiku Tokubako.

Lanterns and a Ceiling Painting of a Dragon

The main hall has numerous lanterns. Their gentle orange light illuminates the dim hall beautifully and solemnly. There is a dragon painted on the ceiling, and the expressions of the dragon changes depending on the viewing angle.

Source:pixta