Nokogiri: Saw Tooth Mountain

Just as the name suggests, Mt. Nokogiri (Nokogiri-yama – Saw Tooth Mountain) is jagged just like the teeth of a saw. Located at the top of the mountain is Nihon-ji, the oldest temple used for imperial prayer in the Kanto area, and actually the entire mountain lays within the precincts of the temple. The views from the summit are wondrous which include great panoramas of the ocean and mountains stretching far into the distance, Izu Oshima Island, and even Mt. Fuji. There are lots of sites to see around this area including the “Jigoku Nozoki” (“Peeking into Hell”) which you can see looking down from the sheer cliffs, one of Japan’s largest Daibutsu statue of Buddha, “Magai Daibutsu”, and also an ancient quarry. Summers are cool and winters are mild so the area is also a popular hiking spot. The biggest attraction on the mountain though is the upper part of the Nihon-ji Temple where giant rocks sprout up, atop which you can stand with your legs apart and look “down into hell” 100 m to the old quarry below.

Address
Motona, Kyonan-machi, Awa-gun, Chiba
Contact No.
+81-470-55-1103
Access
20-minute walk from Hota Station
Opening Hours / Holidays
8:00-17:00 (Until sundown in winter)
Open all year round
Official Website
http://www.city.futtsu.lg.jp/0000000317.html
Time Required
60 minutes
Admission fee
Admission Free

※ Some information is displayed in Japanese and machine-translated English, which may not be accurate.
For the latest information, please check the official website for each spot.

Source:pixta

Mt. Nokogiri Ropeway

Though one can reach the 329.5 m high summit of Mt. Nokogiri by car or on foot, you can also take a ropeway. The ropeway is 680 m long and takes about 4 minutes from the Sanroku Station to the top. On the ride, you can see great panoramic views stretching far into the distance.

Source:pixta

Spectacular Views from the Top

At 329.5 m, it isn’t the tallest mountain there is, but Mt. Nokogiri offers some spectacular views from the top. From the “Jusshu-ichirandai” observation deck, you can even see Oshima Island and Mt. Fuji, as well as Chichibu in Saitama.

Source:pixta

Hykaku-Shaku Kannon Buddhist Statue

Engraved in the old stone quarry is a mysterious carving of a Kannon Buddhist statue. Cut into the bare rock is this Kannon statue that stands at about 30.3 m tall. The statue was finished in 1966 after 6 years of carving. The carving stands vertically in the stone and looking up at it from up close leaves quite an overwhelming impression.

Source:pixta

Tokai 1,500 Rakan Buddhas

Located beside the mountain paths are small Buddha statues, none of which look the same. In total there are 1,553. Starting in 1779 during the Edo period it took about 20 years for the master sculptor, Ono Jingoro and his 27 disciples to complete all of the statues. It is said that no two of these little Buddha share the same expression.

Source:pixta

Cut out from Stone is one of the Largest Daibutsu Statue in Japan: “Magai Daibutusu”

On the mountain is also enshrined one of the largest statues of Buddha in Japan passing even those in Nara and Kamakura, located in the 31 m wide area of the main plaza of the oldest Imperial temple in the Kanto area, Nihon-ji opened around 1,300 years ago. This is one of the largest Daibutsu in Japan and leaves quite an image carved straight from the natural stone. (Entrance fee to Nihon-ji Temple: 600 yen.)

Source:pixta

Nokogiri: Saw Tooth Mountain

Just as the name suggests, Mt. Nokogiri (Nokogiri-yama – Saw Tooth Mountain) is jagged just like the teeth of a saw. Located at the top of the mountain is Nihon-ji, the oldest temple used for imperial prayer in the Kanto area, and actually the entire mountain lays within the precincts of the temple. The views from the summit are wondrous which include great panoramas of the ocean and mountains stretching far into the distance, Izu Oshima Island, and even Mt. Fuji. There are lots of sites to see around this area including the “Jigoku Nozoki” (“Peeking into Hell”) which you can see looking down from the sheer cliffs, one of Japan’s largest Daibutsu statue of Buddha, “Magai Daibutsu”, and also an ancient quarry. Summers are cool and winters are mild so the area is also a popular hiking spot. The biggest attraction on the mountain though is the upper part of the Nihon-ji Temple where giant rocks sprout up, atop which you can stand with your legs apart and look “down into hell” 100 m to the old quarry below.

※ Some information is displayed in Japanese and machine-translated English, which may not be accurate.
For the latest information, please check the official website for each spot.

Source:pixta

Mt. Nokogiri Ropeway

Though one can reach the 329.5 m high summit of Mt. Nokogiri by car or on foot, you can also take a ropeway. The ropeway is 680 m long and takes about 4 minutes from the Sanroku Station to the top. On the ride, you can see great panoramic views stretching far into the distance.

Source:pixta

Spectacular Views from the Top

At 329.5 m, it isn’t the tallest mountain there is, but Mt. Nokogiri offers some spectacular views from the top. From the “Jusshu-ichirandai” observation deck, you can even see Oshima Island and Mt. Fuji, as well as Chichibu in Saitama.

Source:pixta

Hykaku-Shaku Kannon Buddhist Statue

Engraved in the old stone quarry is a mysterious carving of a Kannon Buddhist statue. Cut into the bare rock is this Kannon statue that stands at about 30.3 m tall. The statue was finished in 1966 after 6 years of carving. The carving stands vertically in the stone and looking up at it from up close leaves quite an overwhelming impression.

Source:pixta

Tokai 1,500 Rakan Buddhas

Located beside the mountain paths are small Buddha statues, none of which look the same. In total there are 1,553. Starting in 1779 during the Edo period it took about 20 years for the master sculptor, Ono Jingoro and his 27 disciples to complete all of the statues. It is said that no two of these little Buddha share the same expression.

Source:pixta

Cut out from Stone is one of the Largest Daibutsu Statue in Japan: “Magai Daibutusu”

On the mountain is also enshrined one of the largest statues of Buddha in Japan passing even those in Nara and Kamakura, located in the 31 m wide area of the main plaza of the oldest Imperial temple in the Kanto area, Nihon-ji opened around 1,300 years ago. This is one of the largest Daibutsu in Japan and leaves quite an image carved straight from the natural stone. (Entrance fee to Nihon-ji Temple: 600 yen.)

Source:pixta

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