Naritasan Shinshoji

Source:PIXTA

It is a main temple of Shingon-Chizan buddhist sect, where many believers visited in the Edo period to today. It is known as "Narita's Wisdom King." There are eight branch temples in Japan. In fact, it is the most famous tourist spot in the Narita area. You shouldn't miss this traditional temple with many things to see. In the approx. 200,000-square-meter large territory, there are many precious temple buildings, such as Three-story Pagoda, Gakudo Hall, Komyodo Hall, Shakado Hall, Niomon Gate, etc. Most buildings are chosen as important cultural property.

Address
1 Narita, Narita-shi, Chiba
Contact No.
+81-476-22-2111
Access
10 min walk from Narita station on JR line or Keisei line
Opening Hours / Holidays
Only Halls 8:00‐16:00
Open all year round
Official Website
http://www.naritasan.or.jp/
Time Required
60 min
Admission fee
Free

※ Some information is displayed in Japanese and machine-translated English, which may not be accurate.
For the latest information, please check the official website for each spot.

Source:なめ/PIXTA

Very colorful "Three-story Pagoda"

This colorful and extravagant Three-story Pagoda is chosen as important cultural property. You might think it is recently built because of how bright it is. It is, in fact, built at the beginning of the 18th century. Inside the tower, it enshrines five wisdom Buddhas. On the outside of the tower, "Jyuroku-rakan" is sculpted.

Source:なめ/PIXTA

Place offering frames and ema at "Gakudo Hall"

Built at the end of the Edo period, Gakudo Hall is a building where visitors place offering frames and ema (picture tablet). It is a building where you can learn about beliefs of common people in the modern era. On the frame, names and names of stores are inscribed. Frames and ema in different shapes look like art works.

Get a blessing by turning "Issai-Kyozo"

In the hall, Issai-Kyozo with plenty of Buddhist scriptures is located. If you turn it around, it means that you have the same virtuous deed as reading an entire long sutra. Since it has been protected as a cultural property now, you can't turn it around. Even so, you can still see how big it is.

Source:ロマ/PIXTA

Naritasan Shinshoji

It is a main temple of Shingon-Chizan buddhist sect, where many believers visited in the Edo period to today. It is known as "Narita's Wisdom King." There are eight branch temples in Japan. In fact, it is the most famous tourist spot in the Narita area. You shouldn't miss this traditional temple with many things to see. In the approx. 200,000-square-meter large territory, there are many precious temple buildings, such as Three-story Pagoda, Gakudo Hall, Komyodo Hall, Shakado Hall, Niomon Gate, etc. Most buildings are chosen as important cultural property.

※ Some information is displayed in Japanese and machine-translated English, which may not be accurate.
For the latest information, please check the official website for each spot.

Source:なめ/PIXTA

Very colorful "Three-story Pagoda"

This colorful and extravagant Three-story Pagoda is chosen as important cultural property. You might think it is recently built because of how bright it is. It is, in fact, built at the beginning of the 18th century. Inside the tower, it enshrines five wisdom Buddhas. On the outside of the tower, "Jyuroku-rakan" is sculpted.

Source:なめ/PIXTA

Place offering frames and ema at "Gakudo Hall"

Built at the end of the Edo period, Gakudo Hall is a building where visitors place offering frames and ema (picture tablet). It is a building where you can learn about beliefs of common people in the modern era. On the frame, names and names of stores are inscribed. Frames and ema in different shapes look like art works.

Get a blessing by turning "Issai-Kyozo"

In the hall, Issai-Kyozo with plenty of Buddhist scriptures is located. If you turn it around, it means that you have the same virtuous deed as reading an entire long sutra. Since it has been protected as a cultural property now, you can't turn it around. Even so, you can still see how big it is.

Source:ロマ/PIXTA

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