Museum Meiji Mura

Welcome to the open-air museum in Inuyama city, Aichi, the Museum Meiji Mura. Here, you can see over 60 valuable historic buildings from the Meiji period. During the Meiji period, which lasted from 1868 to 1912, Japan underwent the greatest changes in its history as the country opened up to foreign countries and began absorbing and assimilating the Western world at vigorous speeds. At the time, buildings were made in the latest and most popular styles of architecture in the Western world, but as the generations progressed these characteristic buildings were being rebuilt in changing modern styles, so in 1965 Meiji Mura (Meiji Village) was opened as a place to preserve such historical buildings of the Meiji period.

Address
1 Uchiyama, Inuyama-shi, Aichi
Contact No.
+81-568-67-0314
Access
From the east exit of the Meitetsu Inuyama Station, take a Gifu Community Bus headed towards Meiji Mura for 20 minutes and get off at the last stop.
Opening Hours / Holidays
9:30-17:00 (changes slightly throughout the seasons)
Closed on some days in July, August, December, and January
Official Website
http://www.meijimura.com/
Time Required
1 day
Admission fee
Adults 1,700 yen, university students and people 65 and older 1,300 yen, high school students 1,100 yen, junior high school students 600 yen, elementary students 600 yen
Other Information
*Please check the official website for details concerning hours and set holidays

※ Some information is displayed in Japanese and machine-translated English, which may not be accurate.
For the latest information, please check the official website for each spot.

Reception Hall of Marquis Tsugumichi Saigo House

It is said this Western-style building was originally built around 1880 for Japanese soldiers designed by a French architect. In 1965, the building was officially registered as a national important cultural property. Nowadays, the inside of the building is decorated with furnishings from buildings like Rokumeikan which were used as guest houses during the Meiji period.

Source:photokiti写真日誌

Main Entrance Hall and Lobby of the Imperial Hotel

The Imperial Hotel was designed by the American architect, Frank Lloyd Wright and built in 1923. When the hotel was planned to be rebuilt in 1967, voices from both America and Japan sought to preserve this precious structure and so the main entrance hall and lobby was moved and reconstructed in the Meiji Mura.

Source:Yuky R.

St. John’s Church

St. John’s Church was built by an American missionary architect in 1907. The characteristic feature of the church is the Romanesque architecture often found in medieval Europe combined with Gothic design.

Source:Lonely Trip

Steam Locomotive and Street Cars that were actually used

The Meiji Mura is not just for looking at, but also for experiencing by riding old forms of transportation from the Meiji period. Here, you can find steam locomotives around 140 years old as well as the first street car in Japan that was used in Kyoto. These are popular attractions that will certainly make you feel like you’ve traveled back in time.

Source:ベアーズ

Source:mes pensees

Haikara Ishokan Fashionable Attire Center

The Meiji period was also a time when Western attire became all the rage. In the Haikara Ishokan, you can try on dresses and hakama (traditional Japanese skirt/pants) that were popular during the Meiji period and take a commemorative photo. There are outfits for both guys and girls alike so dress up with your date or family and make a perfect memory of your trip to Meiji Mura.

Source:明治村

Taste some of Japan’s yoshoku cuisine at the Romantei

In Meiji Mura, at the Romantei, you can taste some genuine yoshoku (Japanese and Western style mix) cuisine which became popular in Japan during the Meiji period. We recommend enjoying the omu-rice (rice omelette) amid a relaxed atmosphere of burning lamps. This wondrous dish with ketchup sauce over a fluffy rice-filled omelette is a popular yoshoku dish you can only try in Japan.

Source:食べログ

Museum Meiji Mura

Welcome to the open-air museum in Inuyama city, Aichi, the Museum Meiji Mura. Here, you can see over 60 valuable historic buildings from the Meiji period. During the Meiji period, which lasted from 1868 to 1912, Japan underwent the greatest changes in its history as the country opened up to foreign countries and began absorbing and assimilating the Western world at vigorous speeds. At the time, buildings were made in the latest and most popular styles of architecture in the Western world, but as the generations progressed these characteristic buildings were being rebuilt in changing modern styles, so in 1965 Meiji Mura (Meiji Village) was opened as a place to preserve such historical buildings of the Meiji period.

※ Some information is displayed in Japanese and machine-translated English, which may not be accurate.
For the latest information, please check the official website for each spot.

Reception Hall of Marquis Tsugumichi Saigo House

It is said this Western-style building was originally built around 1880 for Japanese soldiers designed by a French architect. In 1965, the building was officially registered as a national important cultural property. Nowadays, the inside of the building is decorated with furnishings from buildings like Rokumeikan which were used as guest houses during the Meiji period.

Source:photokiti写真日誌

Main Entrance Hall and Lobby of the Imperial Hotel

The Imperial Hotel was designed by the American architect, Frank Lloyd Wright and built in 1923. When the hotel was planned to be rebuilt in 1967, voices from both America and Japan sought to preserve this precious structure and so the main entrance hall and lobby was moved and reconstructed in the Meiji Mura.

Source:Yuky R.

St. John’s Church

St. John’s Church was built by an American missionary architect in 1907. The characteristic feature of the church is the Romanesque architecture often found in medieval Europe combined with Gothic design.

Source:Lonely Trip

Steam Locomotive and Street Cars that were actually used

The Meiji Mura is not just for looking at, but also for experiencing by riding old forms of transportation from the Meiji period. Here, you can find steam locomotives around 140 years old as well as the first street car in Japan that was used in Kyoto. These are popular attractions that will certainly make you feel like you’ve traveled back in time.

Source:ベアーズ

Source:mes pensees

Haikara Ishokan Fashionable Attire Center

The Meiji period was also a time when Western attire became all the rage. In the Haikara Ishokan, you can try on dresses and hakama (traditional Japanese skirt/pants) that were popular during the Meiji period and take a commemorative photo. There are outfits for both guys and girls alike so dress up with your date or family and make a perfect memory of your trip to Meiji Mura.

Source:明治村

Taste some of Japan’s yoshoku cuisine at the Romantei

In Meiji Mura, at the Romantei, you can taste some genuine yoshoku (Japanese and Western style mix) cuisine which became popular in Japan during the Meiji period. We recommend enjoying the omu-rice (rice omelette) amid a relaxed atmosphere of burning lamps. This wondrous dish with ketchup sauce over a fluffy rice-filled omelette is a popular yoshoku dish you can only try in Japan.

Source:食べログ

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