Magome-juku

Magome-juku used to be an outpost thriving from the 17th to the 19th century, in which you can still feel the lingering shadow of the old town here and there. You will find stone-paved sloping paths and old Japanese houses with lattice windows. Along both sides of the approximately 600 m of stone-paved roads, there are houses and hotels, tea shops and souvenir shops, all of which create an ambiance of a townscape of the Edo period. So, once you step into Magome-juku, you can have a taste as if you time-slipped to the Japan of that era. Although a huge fire erupted in 1892 and burned the old Japanese houses built around the 17th to the 19th century, the beautiful townscape was later revived by an exquisite restoration.

Address
4300-1 Magome, Nakatsugawa-shi, Gifu
Contact No.
+81-573-69-2336
Access
Take a bus from JR Nakatsugawa station, get off at the Magome stop and walk for a few minutes.
Opening Hours / Holidays
Please refer to the official website for details because hours of operation and days closed differ from shop to shop.
Official Website
http://www.kiso-magome.com/
Time Required
2.5 hours

※ Some information is displayed in Japanese and machine-translated English, which may not be accurate.
For the latest information, please check the official website for each spot.

Magome Wakihonjin Archives

The Magome Wakihonjin was an exclusive inn located near the center of Magome-juku and only high-ranked people were allowed to stay here during the Edo period. Currently, at the Magome Wakihonjin Archives, a room with a raised floor has been restored, and household belongings and old documents used at that time are exhibited.

Source:岐阜ブログ

Fujimura Memorial House

Toson Shimazaki, a Japanese poet and a novelist, was born in a distinguished family which operated both a Honjin (an inn) and a wholesaler warehouse. Thus, the Fujimura Memorial House, a literature museum, is currently built at the site of Shimazaki’s birthplace. At the Fujimura Memorial House, approximately 6,000 precious documents are stockpiled, such as the manuscript of “Before the Dawn” which is known as one of the masterpieces of Japanese literature.

Source:村井健が行く

Masugata (rectangular space between the inner and outer gates)

Masugata had been constructed for defending the outpost. Usually, a masugata is constructed around castle walls for defense, but this imitation was adapted for Magome-juku. Masugata’s original structures are still in place, so you can see the stone pavement carved at a 90-degree angle and forming steep stairs.

Fully Enjoy Great Nature while Hiking

Magome-juku is also popular for its hiking spots where you can enjoy beautiful scenery, such as a splendid view of Mount Ena boasting a height of 2,192 m along with weeping cherry trees at Eisho-ji. The approximately eight-kilometer hiking course where you can fully appreciate Magome-juku, is also fun for a family, so enjoy a lighthearted stroll.

Local Specialties that You Should Try at Magome-juku

The local specialties at Magome-juku are Kuriokowa (glutinous rice with Japanese chestnuts) and Goheimochi (skewered sweet rice cakes flavored with soy sauce and miso), which had been eaten as the local cuisine for a long time. Goheimochi is especially recommended! It is cooked by crushing sweet rice, putting soy sauce and miso on it, and baking it. You can try freshly baked Goheimochi in many restaurants inside the outpost. So you are highly encouraged to experience the local tastes at least once, which are said to have been eaten beginning from the Edo period.

Source:tecoteco旅日記

Winter Events at Magome-juku

There are two festivals held every year in Magome-juku. The Magome-juku Festival is held in November and the Snow and Ice Festival of Light is held in February. During Winter, Magome-juku exudes a magical atmosphere. For example, the inner town is lit up with Japanese paper-framed lamps during the Magome-juku Festival, and garden lanterns and ice candles are lined up on stone-paved roads during the Snow and Ice Festival of Light.

Magome-juku

Magome-juku used to be an outpost thriving from the 17th to the 19th century, in which you can still feel the lingering shadow of the old town here and there. You will find stone-paved sloping paths and old Japanese houses with lattice windows. Along both sides of the approximately 600 m of stone-paved roads, there are houses and hotels, tea shops and souvenir shops, all of which create an ambiance of a townscape of the Edo period. So, once you step into Magome-juku, you can have a taste as if you time-slipped to the Japan of that era. Although a huge fire erupted in 1892 and burned the old Japanese houses built around the 17th to the 19th century, the beautiful townscape was later revived by an exquisite restoration.

※ Some information is displayed in Japanese and machine-translated English, which may not be accurate.
For the latest information, please check the official website for each spot.

Magome Wakihonjin Archives

The Magome Wakihonjin was an exclusive inn located near the center of Magome-juku and only high-ranked people were allowed to stay here during the Edo period. Currently, at the Magome Wakihonjin Archives, a room with a raised floor has been restored, and household belongings and old documents used at that time are exhibited.

Source:岐阜ブログ

Fujimura Memorial House

Toson Shimazaki, a Japanese poet and a novelist, was born in a distinguished family which operated both a Honjin (an inn) and a wholesaler warehouse. Thus, the Fujimura Memorial House, a literature museum, is currently built at the site of Shimazaki’s birthplace. At the Fujimura Memorial House, approximately 6,000 precious documents are stockpiled, such as the manuscript of “Before the Dawn” which is known as one of the masterpieces of Japanese literature.

Source:村井健が行く

Masugata (rectangular space between the inner and outer gates)

Masugata had been constructed for defending the outpost. Usually, a masugata is constructed around castle walls for defense, but this imitation was adapted for Magome-juku. Masugata’s original structures are still in place, so you can see the stone pavement carved at a 90-degree angle and forming steep stairs.

Fully Enjoy Great Nature while Hiking

Magome-juku is also popular for its hiking spots where you can enjoy beautiful scenery, such as a splendid view of Mount Ena boasting a height of 2,192 m along with weeping cherry trees at Eisho-ji. The approximately eight-kilometer hiking course where you can fully appreciate Magome-juku, is also fun for a family, so enjoy a lighthearted stroll.

Local Specialties that You Should Try at Magome-juku

The local specialties at Magome-juku are Kuriokowa (glutinous rice with Japanese chestnuts) and Goheimochi (skewered sweet rice cakes flavored with soy sauce and miso), which had been eaten as the local cuisine for a long time. Goheimochi is especially recommended! It is cooked by crushing sweet rice, putting soy sauce and miso on it, and baking it. You can try freshly baked Goheimochi in many restaurants inside the outpost. So you are highly encouraged to experience the local tastes at least once, which are said to have been eaten beginning from the Edo period.

Source:tecoteco旅日記

Winter Events at Magome-juku

There are two festivals held every year in Magome-juku. The Magome-juku Festival is held in November and the Snow and Ice Festival of Light is held in February. During Winter, Magome-juku exudes a magical atmosphere. For example, the inner town is lit up with Japanese paper-framed lamps during the Magome-juku Festival, and garden lanterns and ice candles are lined up on stone-paved roads during the Snow and Ice Festival of Light.

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