Kifune Shrine

The Kifune Shrine located near the source of the Kamo River is where deities of water are worshipped. Recently, the area has been noted as a popular “power spot.” This particular Kifune Shrine is the headquarters of about 450 other Kifune shrines located around Japan. The actual name of the region is Kibune. However, for linguistic reasons in the Japanese language, the character for “bu” is considered inappropriate when referring to the deity of water, so the shrine goes by the name of “Kifune.” Since the ancient Heian period, the deity of rain has been especially revered in the Kifune Shrine, and even today many people who have water-related businesses come to pray at this shrine. Kifune Shrine is also well known for blessing relationships and so many couples come to pray for good fortune in love while others have wedding ceremonies on the shrine grounds.

Address
180 Kurama Kibune-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto-shi, Kyoto
Contact No.
+81-7-5741-2016
Access
30-min walk from the Kibune-guchi Station on the Eizan Railway; Kyoto Bus Line 33 for 5 min up to Kibune bus stop, followed by a 5-min walk.
Opening Hours / Holidays
6:00-20:00
Open all year round

Official Website
http://kifunejinja.jp/
Time Required
60 minutes
Admission fee
Free

※ Some information is displayed in Japanese and machine-translated English, which may not be accurate.
For the latest information, please check the official website for each spot.

Source:gandhi / PIXTA

Mizu-ura Mikuji (Water Paper Fortunes)

The most popular attraction of Kifune Shrine are the "mizu-ura mikuji," fortunes that mysteriously appear on paper when placed into the sacred pools of water. It is said that the water deities know all, and that their readings are remarkably accurate. Be sure not to miss this rare chance when you come to visit Kifune Shrine.

Source:BLAST / PIXTA

Nakamiya, Yuinoyashiro

The main shrine located in the main building of Kifune Shrine is divided into the nakamiya (yuinoyashiro) middle shrine, and the okunomiya, rear shrine. It is in the nakamiya where the deity of love is enshrined. Kifune Shrine was originally a shrine dedicated to blessing couples and apparently holds a record for love prayers back in the Heian period.

Source:hurricane / PIXTA

Okunomiya

Kifune Shrine is recognized by many as a “power spot” in Kyoto, but it said that the okunomiya (rear shrine) holds the greatest amount of energy. From the shrine’s initial foundation until the year 1055, the okunomiya acted as the main shrine where deities dwelled, and so it is believed today that one can feel a special presence in this rear shrine. Next to the okunomiya is also a boat-shaped rock where many pray for safety on ocean voyages and travels.

Source:放し飼い / PIXTA

Kifune Shrine

The Kifune Shrine located near the source of the Kamo River is where deities of water are worshipped. Recently, the area has been noted as a popular “power spot.” This particular Kifune Shrine is the headquarters of about 450 other Kifune shrines located around Japan. The actual name of the region is Kibune. However, for linguistic reasons in the Japanese language, the character for “bu” is considered inappropriate when referring to the deity of water, so the shrine goes by the name of “Kifune.” Since the ancient Heian period, the deity of rain has been especially revered in the Kifune Shrine, and even today many people who have water-related businesses come to pray at this shrine. Kifune Shrine is also well known for blessing relationships and so many couples come to pray for good fortune in love while others have wedding ceremonies on the shrine grounds.

※ Some information is displayed in Japanese and machine-translated English, which may not be accurate.
For the latest information, please check the official website for each spot.

Source:gandhi / PIXTA

Mizu-ura Mikuji (Water Paper Fortunes)

The most popular attraction of Kifune Shrine are the "mizu-ura mikuji," fortunes that mysteriously appear on paper when placed into the sacred pools of water. It is said that the water deities know all, and that their readings are remarkably accurate. Be sure not to miss this rare chance when you come to visit Kifune Shrine.

Source:BLAST / PIXTA

Nakamiya, Yuinoyashiro

The main shrine located in the main building of Kifune Shrine is divided into the nakamiya (yuinoyashiro) middle shrine, and the okunomiya, rear shrine. It is in the nakamiya where the deity of love is enshrined. Kifune Shrine was originally a shrine dedicated to blessing couples and apparently holds a record for love prayers back in the Heian period.

Source:hurricane / PIXTA

Okunomiya

Kifune Shrine is recognized by many as a “power spot” in Kyoto, but it said that the okunomiya (rear shrine) holds the greatest amount of energy. From the shrine’s initial foundation until the year 1055, the okunomiya acted as the main shrine where deities dwelled, and so it is believed today that one can feel a special presence in this rear shrine. Next to the okunomiya is also a boat-shaped rock where many pray for safety on ocean voyages and travels.

Source:放し飼い / PIXTA

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