Atsuta Jingu

Atsuta Jingu (shrine) has a history of 1,900 years and is the second most prestigious shrine after Ise Jingu in Shinto religion. Kusanagi no mitsurugi (Sword of Kusanagi) is enshrined here and this has been succeeded in the imperial family from the age of myth to present day as one of the three Imperial Regalia. It has 42 annexes other than the main shrine and each building has a long and distinguished history. Imperial families, feudal military leaders in Sengoku period, and businessmen religiously visited here and it is said that Atsuta Jingu is one of the best power spots in Japan. In the shrine premises, trees that have aged over a long time continue to grow in this still atmosphere.

Address
1-1-1 Jingu, Atsuta-ku, Nagoya-shi, Aichi
Contact No.
+81-52-671-4151
Access
8-min walk from Atsuta station on JR Line 3-min walk from Jiugu-mae station on Meitetsu Line 7-min walk from Nagoya Municipal Subway Denma- cho station
Opening Hours / Holidays
Houmotsukan:
Opening Hours: 9:00-16:30
Closed: Last Wednesday of the month and following day, Dec 25 to 31
Official Website
https://www.atsutajingu.or.jp/
Time Required
90 min
Admission fee
Houmotsukan: Adult 300 yen, Child (6-15 years old) 150 yen

※ Some information is displayed in Japanese and machine-translated English, which may not be accurate.
For the latest information, please check the official website for each spot.

Three Imperial Regalia and an unopened gate

The three Imperial Regalia refer to the three treasures which have been handed over to successive emperors. It is said that the mirror is in Ise Jingu, the comma-shaped Jewel is at the Imperial Palace in Tokyo, and the sword is in Atsuta Jingu but no one, including imperial families, have seen these treasures. Kusanagi no mitsurugi (Sword of Kusanagi) enshrined in Atsuta Jingu is said to have been stolen in 668. Therefore, the gate Seisetsu-Mon, where the thief may have passed, has been kept unopened until now so as not to allow anyone to bring it out again.

Main shrine with one of the three Imperial Regalia

The main shrine is located in the furthest part of Atsuta Jingu. Atsuta no Okami whose sacred object is Kusanagi no mitsurugi is enshrined here. The current shrine was built in 1955 in the same architectural style as Ise Jingu where one the three Imperial Regalia is kept. Old material from Ise Jingu's regular renovation was reused in its construction.

Ichinomisaki Jinja: A power spot at the back of the main shrine

Ichinomisaki Jinja inconspicuously stands at the back of the main shrine. It enshrines "Aramitama" which shows the power of Atsuta no Okami. This place is said to be the most sacred place and people were forbidden to visit until 2012. Even now, people can only visit but no photography is allowed.

Nobunaga-Bei: Ride on the luck of Oda Nobunaga

Oda Nobunaga, a famous feudal military leader, won in the Battle of Okehazama in spite of his drawback. He donated a moat in return for the victory and the moat still remains in the precincts as Nobunaga-Bei. In the battle, he supposedly won by taking advantage of the weather. So this is a spot for people who want to ride on his luck.

Sword collection in Homotsukan

Homotsukan (Treasure Exhibition Hall) keeps about 6,000 of precious treasures and displays them in series. It includes 176 of national treasures, important cultural properties, and designated cultural properties and it especially has a comprehensive sword collection. All stored items have been donated and Atsuta Jingu hasn't gathered any on its own. This tells us how deeply many famous people believed in Atsuta Jingu during each period.

Hitsumabushi: Specialty in Atsuta Jingu

After walking through the large Atsuta Jingu, let's try a specialty of Nagoya, Hitsumabushi (rice bowl with eel).  We recommend Atsuta Horaiken, the first of its kind that has been around since 1873 located near the entrance gate of Atsuta Jingu. First taste the delicious Hitsumabushi itself, char-grilled and smoky eel with a secret sauce followed by mixing it with some seasonings. Finally, eat it as Ochazuke (rice with poured tea).

Source:食べログ

Atsuta Jingu

Atsuta Jingu (shrine) has a history of 1,900 years and is the second most prestigious shrine after Ise Jingu in Shinto religion. Kusanagi no mitsurugi (Sword of Kusanagi) is enshrined here and this has been succeeded in the imperial family from the age of myth to present day as one of the three Imperial Regalia. It has 42 annexes other than the main shrine and each building has a long and distinguished history. Imperial families, feudal military leaders in Sengoku period, and businessmen religiously visited here and it is said that Atsuta Jingu is one of the best power spots in Japan. In the shrine premises, trees that have aged over a long time continue to grow in this still atmosphere.

※ Some information is displayed in Japanese and machine-translated English, which may not be accurate.
For the latest information, please check the official website for each spot.

Three Imperial Regalia and an unopened gate

The three Imperial Regalia refer to the three treasures which have been handed over to successive emperors. It is said that the mirror is in Ise Jingu, the comma-shaped Jewel is at the Imperial Palace in Tokyo, and the sword is in Atsuta Jingu but no one, including imperial families, have seen these treasures. Kusanagi no mitsurugi (Sword of Kusanagi) enshrined in Atsuta Jingu is said to have been stolen in 668. Therefore, the gate Seisetsu-Mon, where the thief may have passed, has been kept unopened until now so as not to allow anyone to bring it out again.

Main shrine with one of the three Imperial Regalia

The main shrine is located in the furthest part of Atsuta Jingu. Atsuta no Okami whose sacred object is Kusanagi no mitsurugi is enshrined here. The current shrine was built in 1955 in the same architectural style as Ise Jingu where one the three Imperial Regalia is kept. Old material from Ise Jingu's regular renovation was reused in its construction.

Ichinomisaki Jinja: A power spot at the back of the main shrine

Ichinomisaki Jinja inconspicuously stands at the back of the main shrine. It enshrines "Aramitama" which shows the power of Atsuta no Okami. This place is said to be the most sacred place and people were forbidden to visit until 2012. Even now, people can only visit but no photography is allowed.

Nobunaga-Bei: Ride on the luck of Oda Nobunaga

Oda Nobunaga, a famous feudal military leader, won in the Battle of Okehazama in spite of his drawback. He donated a moat in return for the victory and the moat still remains in the precincts as Nobunaga-Bei. In the battle, he supposedly won by taking advantage of the weather. So this is a spot for people who want to ride on his luck.

Sword collection in Homotsukan

Homotsukan (Treasure Exhibition Hall) keeps about 6,000 of precious treasures and displays them in series. It includes 176 of national treasures, important cultural properties, and designated cultural properties and it especially has a comprehensive sword collection. All stored items have been donated and Atsuta Jingu hasn't gathered any on its own. This tells us how deeply many famous people believed in Atsuta Jingu during each period.

Hitsumabushi: Specialty in Atsuta Jingu

After walking through the large Atsuta Jingu, let's try a specialty of Nagoya, Hitsumabushi (rice bowl with eel).  We recommend Atsuta Horaiken, the first of its kind that has been around since 1873 located near the entrance gate of Atsuta Jingu. First taste the delicious Hitsumabushi itself, char-grilled and smoky eel with a secret sauce followed by mixing it with some seasonings. Finally, eat it as Ochazuke (rice with poured tea).

Source:食べログ

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