Shimabara Castle

Source:pixta

Shimabara Castle was constructed over the course of seven years and finished in 1624 by Matsukura Shigemasa who was praised as a master castle builder. At the time of its construction in the early Edo period, heavy taxes were imposed and are said to be the cause behind one of the largest uprisings in Japanese history, the “Shimabara Rebellion.” The castle was dismantled during the Meiji period, but was rebuilt in 1964. It is counted as one of the top 100 castles in Japan, so get up close to witness the massive power of Shimabara Castle.

Address
1-1183-1 Jonai, Shimabara-shi, Nagasaki
Contact No.
+81-957-62-4766
Access
10-minute walk from Shimabara Station on the Shimabara Railway
Opening Hours / Holidays
9:00-17:30
Open all year round
Official Website
http://shimabarajou.com/
Time Required
60 minutes
Admission fee
Entrance Fee: 540 yen (Christian Museum, Tourism Museum, and Seibo Memorial Hall)
Best time to see
Lotus flowers bloom from late July to early August

※ Some information is displayed in Japanese and machine-translated English, which may not be accurate.
For the latest information, please check the official website for each spot.

Source:wikipedia

Reconstructed Castle Tower

The reconstructed white, five-tiered main castle tower is a beautiful sight to behold. From the castle, you can get great views of the Ariake Sea and Kumamoto on the other side, as well as the nearby volcano of Unzen-dake. Inside of the castle tower is a history museum with documents and items concerning the “Shimabara Rebellion” to help you learn more about this intriguing spot.

Source:pixta

Rare Lotus Flowers that Bloom in the Moat

In summer, beautiful lotus flowers bloom in Shimabara Castle’s surrounding moat. From the deep green leaves come the beautiful faces of a rare breed of lotus, “suihiren,” nelumbo nucifera. These lotuses were originally planted for food during the Meiji period. Please get up close for a view of these lovely flowers.

Source:pixta

Turn into a Ninja or Samurai for Free!

Ninja and samurai costumes are available at Shimabara Castle so that anyone can enjoy casually slipping into a different world. Try on some of the various costumes and take a picture creating an unforgettable memory on your trip. All of this is for free, so please go ahead and give it a try.

Source:wikipedia

View from the Top of the Castle

From the observation deck on the 5F of the castle tower, you can get great views of the Ariake Sea and the massive volcano of Unzen-dake.

Source:pixta

Sasebo Burger

In various restaurants that focus on different characteristics which all go by the common term of “Sasebo Burger,” you can get delicious burgers made by hand fresh after you order. Some of these restaurants can be found around Shimabara Castle. If you find yourself getting hungry in the castle, by all means go get yourself a burger!

Source:pixta

Bukeyashiki Samurai Residences

The “bukeyashiki” (name for a district of former residences of samurai as well as individual samurai residences) were built along with Shimabara Castle as residences for the local samurai. Nowadays, in the bukeyashiki, three of the samurai residences are preserved as they were in olden times and a charming clear water drain runs through the center of the main street. By walking down these streets, you’ll feel like you’ve been sent right back to the ancient Edo period.

Source:pixta

Shimabara Castle

Shimabara Castle was constructed over the course of seven years and finished in 1624 by Matsukura Shigemasa who was praised as a master castle builder. At the time of its construction in the early Edo period, heavy taxes were imposed and are said to be the cause behind one of the largest uprisings in Japanese history, the “Shimabara Rebellion.” The castle was dismantled during the Meiji period, but was rebuilt in 1964. It is counted as one of the top 100 castles in Japan, so get up close to witness the massive power of Shimabara Castle.

※ Some information is displayed in Japanese and machine-translated English, which may not be accurate.
For the latest information, please check the official website for each spot.

Source:wikipedia

Reconstructed Castle Tower

The reconstructed white, five-tiered main castle tower is a beautiful sight to behold. From the castle, you can get great views of the Ariake Sea and Kumamoto on the other side, as well as the nearby volcano of Unzen-dake. Inside of the castle tower is a history museum with documents and items concerning the “Shimabara Rebellion” to help you learn more about this intriguing spot.

Source:pixta

Rare Lotus Flowers that Bloom in the Moat

In summer, beautiful lotus flowers bloom in Shimabara Castle’s surrounding moat. From the deep green leaves come the beautiful faces of a rare breed of lotus, “suihiren,” nelumbo nucifera. These lotuses were originally planted for food during the Meiji period. Please get up close for a view of these lovely flowers.

Source:pixta

Turn into a Ninja or Samurai for Free!

Ninja and samurai costumes are available at Shimabara Castle so that anyone can enjoy casually slipping into a different world. Try on some of the various costumes and take a picture creating an unforgettable memory on your trip. All of this is for free, so please go ahead and give it a try.

Source:wikipedia

View from the Top of the Castle

From the observation deck on the 5F of the castle tower, you can get great views of the Ariake Sea and the massive volcano of Unzen-dake.

Source:pixta

Sasebo Burger

In various restaurants that focus on different characteristics which all go by the common term of “Sasebo Burger,” you can get delicious burgers made by hand fresh after you order. Some of these restaurants can be found around Shimabara Castle. If you find yourself getting hungry in the castle, by all means go get yourself a burger!

Source:pixta

Bukeyashiki Samurai Residences

The “bukeyashiki” (name for a district of former residences of samurai as well as individual samurai residences) were built along with Shimabara Castle as residences for the local samurai. Nowadays, in the bukeyashiki, three of the samurai residences are preserved as they were in olden times and a charming clear water drain runs through the center of the main street. By walking down these streets, you’ll feel like you’ve been sent right back to the ancient Edo period.

Source:pixta

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