Seikan Tunnel Museum

Source:アプティネット)

The longest undersea tunnel in the world, Seikan Tunnel came into operation in March 1988. It took 42 years for this tunnel to breakthrough after it was originally planned and took 65 years to complete. Seikan Tunnel Museum introduces the structure of this tunnel by exhibiting solid models, videos, and display panels. The history of this big project is shown in the way that is easy to understand. Under the sea, there is an exhibition zone where visitors can learn how this magnificent 53.85 km tunnel built 240 m under the sea was completed. Go and feel the magnificence of this great project that Japan boasts of to the world.

Address
99 Minmayatatsuhama, Sotogahama-machi, Higashi Tsugaru-gun, Aomori
Contact No.
+81-174-38-2301
Access
30 minutes' ride on Sotogahama Circular Bus bound for Tappizaki-todai from JR Minmaya Station. Get off at the bus stop Seikan Tunnel Kinenkan-mae followed by a short walk.
Opening Hours / Holidays
Opening hours: 8:40-17:00
Closed: November 11-April 24
Official Website
http://seikan-tunnel-museum.jp/
Admission fee
Admission: 400 yen (Exhibition zone 1,000 yen)

※ Some information is displayed in Japanese and machine-translated English, which may not be accurate.
For the latest information, please check the official website for each spot.

Exhibition Hall where visitors can learn the history of Seikan Tunnel.

It needed 65 years for Seikan Tunnel to complete after it was originally planned. The Exhibition Hall has several documents that introduce the history during these years and how this tunnel was actually built. The project proceeded even under severe conditions. Let’s follow the tracks of history under which this tunnel was constructed.

Go down to 140 meters below sea level on a cable car “Mogura”.

You can actually go through the shaft down to the tunnel and see how this 53.85 km long tunnel was constructed 240 m below the sea level. If you take the cable car called “Mogura (mole)” on Seikan Tunnel Tappi Shako Line, the shortest railroad in Japan, it leads you down along the inclined shaft leaning 14° to 140 m below the sea level in only 9 minutes.

Underground tunnel that shows the passion of the massive construction.

A part of the underground tunnel is used as a special exhibition area where visitors can look around in 45 minutes. They have machinery and devices that were actually used to excavate this tunnel. Walking around these exhibits makes us feel admiration for the technology and the passion of the workers who completed this massive construction that Japan boasts about to the world.

Seikan Tunnel Museum

The longest undersea tunnel in the world, Seikan Tunnel came into operation in March 1988. It took 42 years for this tunnel to breakthrough after it was originally planned and took 65 years to complete. Seikan Tunnel Museum introduces the structure of this tunnel by exhibiting solid models, videos, and display panels. The history of this big project is shown in the way that is easy to understand. Under the sea, there is an exhibition zone where visitors can learn how this magnificent 53.85 km tunnel built 240 m under the sea was completed. Go and feel the magnificence of this great project that Japan boasts of to the world.

※ Some information is displayed in Japanese and machine-translated English, which may not be accurate.
For the latest information, please check the official website for each spot.

Exhibition Hall where visitors can learn the history of Seikan Tunnel.

It needed 65 years for Seikan Tunnel to complete after it was originally planned. The Exhibition Hall has several documents that introduce the history during these years and how this tunnel was actually built. The project proceeded even under severe conditions. Let’s follow the tracks of history under which this tunnel was constructed.

Go down to 140 meters below sea level on a cable car “Mogura”.

You can actually go through the shaft down to the tunnel and see how this 53.85 km long tunnel was constructed 240 m below the sea level. If you take the cable car called “Mogura (mole)” on Seikan Tunnel Tappi Shako Line, the shortest railroad in Japan, it leads you down along the inclined shaft leaning 14° to 140 m below the sea level in only 9 minutes.

Underground tunnel that shows the passion of the massive construction.

A part of the underground tunnel is used as a special exhibition area where visitors can look around in 45 minutes. They have machinery and devices that were actually used to excavate this tunnel. Walking around these exhibits makes us feel admiration for the technology and the passion of the workers who completed this massive construction that Japan boasts about to the world.

Search by purpose

See More