Kakunodate

Source:PIXTA

Kakunodate still has the townscape that was built around 300 years ago. It is known as a place with many "bukeyashiki," houses where samurai and merchants used to live. Many tourists come to see the bukeyashiki, however, it is also a well-known sakura spot. The shidare-zakura of Kakunodate, that once started with only three young trees, are now registered as a national natural heritage. Along the nearby river Hinokinai, there are sakura trees planted across 2 km, further enhancing the sakura of Kakunodate.

Address
38-5 Kobitomachi, Kakunodatemachi, Senboku-shi, Akita
Contact No.
+81-187-54-2700
Access
20-min walk from JR Kakunodate Station
Official Website
http://kakunodate-kanko.jp/
Time Required
Half day
Best time to see
Forecast for blooming: 4/20 Forecast for full bloom (peak): 4/27~

※ Some information is displayed in Japanese and machine-translated English, which may not be accurate.
For the latest information, please check the official website for each spot.

Source:PIXTA

Sakura on Bukeyashiki Street

Bukeyashiki can be said to be a synonym for Kakunodate. There are no words to describe the beauty of the light pink shidare-zakura that bloom over the black wooden fences, as if to cover them. It creates a remarkable sight. It is a specialty of Kakunodake that has been protected by the local people since long ago.

Source:PIXTA

Sakura Along the Hinokinai River

Hinokinai river flows next to the street that is behind Bukeyashiki street. There are 400 sakura trees alongside this river, spanning across 2 km. It is overwhelming to see the rows of sakura that continue as far as you can see. We recommend that you take a walk along the river walking under the sakura trees.

Source:PIXTA

Sakura Festival

Kakunodate Sakura Festival is held every year from April 20th until May 5th. This is a highly popular festival where over 1.2 million tourists visit from within and outside Japan. Not only do various stalls and stores open up but there are also many events held such as local traditional performances and illuminations during night time.

Source:PIXTA

Kakunodate

Kakunodate still has the townscape that was built around 300 years ago. It is known as a place with many "bukeyashiki," houses where samurai and merchants used to live. Many tourists come to see the bukeyashiki, however, it is also a well-known sakura spot. The shidare-zakura of Kakunodate, that once started with only three young trees, are now registered as a national natural heritage. Along the nearby river Hinokinai, there are sakura trees planted across 2 km, further enhancing the sakura of Kakunodate.

※ Some information is displayed in Japanese and machine-translated English, which may not be accurate.
For the latest information, please check the official website for each spot.

Source:PIXTA

Sakura on Bukeyashiki Street

Bukeyashiki can be said to be a synonym for Kakunodate. There are no words to describe the beauty of the light pink shidare-zakura that bloom over the black wooden fences, as if to cover them. It creates a remarkable sight. It is a specialty of Kakunodake that has been protected by the local people since long ago.

Source:PIXTA

Sakura Along the Hinokinai River

Hinokinai river flows next to the street that is behind Bukeyashiki street. There are 400 sakura trees alongside this river, spanning across 2 km. It is overwhelming to see the rows of sakura that continue as far as you can see. We recommend that you take a walk along the river walking under the sakura trees.

Source:PIXTA

Sakura Festival

Kakunodate Sakura Festival is held every year from April 20th until May 5th. This is a highly popular festival where over 1.2 million tourists visit from within and outside Japan. Not only do various stalls and stores open up but there are also many events held such as local traditional performances and illuminations during night time.

Source:PIXTA

For reservations

See More