Nezu Shrine

Legend has it, this honorable shrine was inaugurated by a great man around 1900 years ago. The current building was built in 1706 and is selected as one of Japan's important cultural heritages. It has many characteristic seasonal attractions such as the annual event taking place in September and the Azalea Festival celebrating the full bloom of the azalea in spring. Many of Japan's great authors lived in its surrounding area, which is why there are stones placed in memory of the writers, making it a hot spot for Japanese-literature lovers.

Address
1-28-9 Nezu, Bunkyo, Tokyo
Contact No.
+81-3-3822-0753
Access
5-min walk from Nezu station or Sendagi station on Tokyo Metro Chiyoda Line and Todaimae station on Namboku Line
Official Website
http://www.nedujinja.or.jp/
Time Required
30 minutes

※ Some information is displayed in Japanese and machine-translated English, which may not be accurate.
For the latest information, please check the official website for each spot.

Original buildings since Edo era

The main hall was built by Edo's 5th Shogun in 1706. It is a precious space with buildings including the main hall, Heiden, Haiden, Sukibei,  Karamon, Nishimon, and Romon (gates) all in their original state as when they were built. Viewers can admire the traditional Japanese-style architecture and artistic techniques employed in these masterpieces.

Traditional annual festival in September

The shrine's annual festival, which is said to be one of the Three Great Edo Festivals, is held every year between mid- to late September. In this traditional festival that was established by the 6th Shogun in 1714, dances are performed as an offering to god and a mikoshi (portable shrine) is carried around.

Azalea garden in spring

The Bunkyo Azalea Festival goes on from around mid-April to the beginning of May. The Azalea garden inside Nezu Shrine's property spans across approx. 6,500 square meters and has around 3,000 azalea plants of 100 species. During the festival period, it adopts a lively atmosphere with tea stalls and food stands.

Nezu Shrine

Legend has it, this honorable shrine was inaugurated by a great man around 1900 years ago. The current building was built in 1706 and is selected as one of Japan's important cultural heritages. It has many characteristic seasonal attractions such as the annual event taking place in September and the Azalea Festival celebrating the full bloom of the azalea in spring. Many of Japan's great authors lived in its surrounding area, which is why there are stones placed in memory of the writers, making it a hot spot for Japanese-literature lovers.

※ Some information is displayed in Japanese and machine-translated English, which may not be accurate.
For the latest information, please check the official website for each spot.

Original buildings since Edo era

The main hall was built by Edo's 5th Shogun in 1706. It is a precious space with buildings including the main hall, Heiden, Haiden, Sukibei,  Karamon, Nishimon, and Romon (gates) all in their original state as when they were built. Viewers can admire the traditional Japanese-style architecture and artistic techniques employed in these masterpieces.

Traditional annual festival in September

The shrine's annual festival, which is said to be one of the Three Great Edo Festivals, is held every year between mid- to late September. In this traditional festival that was established by the 6th Shogun in 1714, dances are performed as an offering to god and a mikoshi (portable shrine) is carried around.

Azalea garden in spring

The Bunkyo Azalea Festival goes on from around mid-April to the beginning of May. The Azalea garden inside Nezu Shrine's property spans across approx. 6,500 square meters and has around 3,000 azalea plants of 100 species. During the festival period, it adopts a lively atmosphere with tea stalls and food stands.

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