Edo-Tokyo Museum

Founded in 1993, Edo-Tokyo Museum is located next to Ryogoku Kokugikan where the sumo tournaments take place. The museum showcases models of buildings and landscape as well as valuable resources that reflect on Edo-Tokyo from the period of Edo through post war. The models give visitors a glimpse of the life of the Edo Period. The museum also provides a hands-on corner for visitors to experience and learn various aspects that were characteristic of that time. You don't want to miss the Edo Zone on the 6th floor that introduces a townscape of Edo with miniature models. Here you will find houses and clothing of the period that are precisely re-created with the models. Visitors learn the different lifestyles of Daimyo (feudal lord) and ordinary people and their characteristics.

Address
1-4-1 Yokoami, Sumida, Tokyo
Contact No.
+81-3-3626-9974
Access
1-min walk from A4 exit, Ryogoku Station on Tokyo Metro Oedo Line 3-min walk from Nishi (West) exit, Ryogoku Station on JR Line
Opening Hours / Holidays
9:30-17:30 *9:30-19:30 on Saturdays
Closed: Mondays (when falls on National holidays/substitute public holiday, next day), year-end and New Year holidays
Official Website
https://www.edo-tokyo-museum.or.jp/
Time Required
2.5 hours
Admission fee
Permanent exhibition: adults-600 yen, college and vocational college students-480 yen, high school, junior high school students and 65+ years of age-300 yen, elementary school students and under-free
Language
English, Chinese and Korean
Other Information
*Pamphlet (English, Spanish, Chinese and Korean) available

※ Some information is displayed in Japanese and machine-translated English, which may not be accurate.
For the latest information, please check the official website for each spot.

Source:Wikimedia Commons

Source:pixta

Full-scale Nihonbashi Bridge

You will see the recreated full-scale version of Nihonbashi Bridge right after the entrance to the exhibition room on the 6th floor. The structure has an open ceiling space from the 5th floor to the 6th floor, so you can look over the entire floor from Nihonbashi. The buildings from the Edo and Meiji Period are very compelling. You will almost forget that they are miniature models.

Source:下手な横好き

Theater Nakamura-za

In the center of the 5th floor, an actual size replica of Nakamura-za is displayed. Nakmura-za was a kabuki theater that existed in the early 19th century. Kabuki flourished in the Edo Period as the most popular form of entertainment. Nakamura-za was one of the indispensable places for people in the town Edo at the time.

Recreated Kabuki Stage

A re-creation of a very popular play of Edo Kabuki, Sukeroku Yukari no Edozakura (The Flower of Edo), is on the display. The same style of costumes and props as the present Kabuki play are displayed on the dolls. You will be amazed how authentic and exquisite the stage is.

Source:pixta

Daimyo Palanquin

A palanquin was one of the methods of transportation in the Edo Period. The style of palanquin varied according to the rank and position of the occupant. Special decorations were given to a daimyo palanquin that carried a daimyo (feudal lord), such as a sliding door. Visitors can ride on this replica of daimyo palanquin in Edo-Tokyo Museum.

Bar District of Ryogoku

Ryogoku was one of the busiest bar districts in the Edo Period competing with Asakusa. In the Edo Zone on the 5th floor, Ryogoku of the period is intricately re-created with miniature models. Visitors can learn the characteristics and liveliness of Ryogoku.

Source:Wikimedia Commons

Mitsui Echigoya, the biggest store in Edo

Mitsui Echigoya was the biggest store in Edo and predecessor of the first department store in Japan, Mitsukoshi. The flourishing Mitsui Echigoya is precisely recreated in the Edo Zone on the 5th floor. The miniature model has an entertaining mechanism such that the shop curtains of the entrance move every 15 minutes.

Source:pixta

Edo-Tokyo Museum

Founded in 1993, Edo-Tokyo Museum is located next to Ryogoku Kokugikan where the sumo tournaments take place. The museum showcases models of buildings and landscape as well as valuable resources that reflect on Edo-Tokyo from the period of Edo through post war. The models give visitors a glimpse of the life of the Edo Period. The museum also provides a hands-on corner for visitors to experience and learn various aspects that were characteristic of that time. You don't want to miss the Edo Zone on the 6th floor that introduces a townscape of Edo with miniature models. Here you will find houses and clothing of the period that are precisely re-created with the models. Visitors learn the different lifestyles of Daimyo (feudal lord) and ordinary people and their characteristics.

※ Some information is displayed in Japanese and machine-translated English, which may not be accurate.
For the latest information, please check the official website for each spot.

Source:Wikimedia Commons

Source:pixta

Full-scale Nihonbashi Bridge

You will see the recreated full-scale version of Nihonbashi Bridge right after the entrance to the exhibition room on the 6th floor. The structure has an open ceiling space from the 5th floor to the 6th floor, so you can look over the entire floor from Nihonbashi. The buildings from the Edo and Meiji Period are very compelling. You will almost forget that they are miniature models.

Source:下手な横好き

Theater Nakamura-za

In the center of the 5th floor, an actual size replica of Nakamura-za is displayed. Nakmura-za was a kabuki theater that existed in the early 19th century. Kabuki flourished in the Edo Period as the most popular form of entertainment. Nakamura-za was one of the indispensable places for people in the town Edo at the time.

Recreated Kabuki Stage

A re-creation of a very popular play of Edo Kabuki, Sukeroku Yukari no Edozakura (The Flower of Edo), is on the display. The same style of costumes and props as the present Kabuki play are displayed on the dolls. You will be amazed how authentic and exquisite the stage is.

Source:pixta

Daimyo Palanquin

A palanquin was one of the methods of transportation in the Edo Period. The style of palanquin varied according to the rank and position of the occupant. Special decorations were given to a daimyo palanquin that carried a daimyo (feudal lord), such as a sliding door. Visitors can ride on this replica of daimyo palanquin in Edo-Tokyo Museum.

Bar District of Ryogoku

Ryogoku was one of the busiest bar districts in the Edo Period competing with Asakusa. In the Edo Zone on the 5th floor, Ryogoku of the period is intricately re-created with miniature models. Visitors can learn the characteristics and liveliness of Ryogoku.

Source:Wikimedia Commons

Mitsui Echigoya, the biggest store in Edo

Mitsui Echigoya was the biggest store in Edo and predecessor of the first department store in Japan, Mitsukoshi. The flourishing Mitsui Echigoya is precisely recreated in the Edo Zone on the 5th floor. The miniature model has an entertaining mechanism such that the shop curtains of the entrance move every 15 minutes.

Source:pixta

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